ART MUSIC IN WORLD

PRESS : What our team found for you 

1- Women in Music Index

– Overview of world wide initiatives for and from women in music –

 

The term diversity describes differences in racial or ethnic classifications, age, gender, religion, philosophy, physical abilities, socioeconomic background, sexual orientation, gender identity, intelligence, mental health, physical health, genetic attributes, behavior, attractiveness, or other identifying features. Diversity and inclusivity – specifically in terms of gender diversity in the music business – have become buzzwords in recent times, but the overwhelming majority of the world’s spokespeople and decision makers are still male – that’s a fact. Many seem to have forgotten that the culture we cherish and celebrate was originally created by marginalized groups as a form of self-expression, tolerance and acceptance.

Through its worldwide network the Music Cities Network started an index of research, studies, panels, networks, conferences, events, policies, festivals, mentoring, funding programs, and collectives with a female focus in the creative and music industries. The aim is to broaden the visibility of female focus music networks, to get inspired and connect the dots which haven’t been done so before – for new ideas and future connections. This index is by no means exhaustive. The entries will be updated and expanded regularly. You can filter by column and search after keywords.

https://www.musiccitiesnetwork.com/projects-details/women-in-music

2- In-Venue Music Recognition Technology Is Changing Artist Payouts — One Country at a Time

Early movers in club, festival, and in-venue music recognition technology (MRT): United Kingdom (PRS+PPL); France (SACEM); Belgium (SABAM); Switzerland (SUISA); The Netherlands (BUMA/Stemra, SENA), plus Australia (APRA) & New Zealand (APRA, OneMusic). Spain (SGAE) is MRT-enabled for festivals; Germany (GEMA, GVL) has limited, early-stage deployment.

Early movers in club, festival, and in-venue music recognition technology (MRT): United Kingdom (PRS+PPL); France (SACEM); Belgium (SABAM); Switzerland (SUISA); The Netherlands (BUMA/Stemra, SENA), plus Australia (APRA) & New Zealand (APRA, OneMusic). Spain (SGAE) is MRT-enabled for festivals; Germany (GEMA, GVL) has limited, early-stage deployment.

One of the biggest challenges confronting the music industry is simple recognition.  If a song is played, is it actually recognized, processed, and paid?

In the U.S., that’s a serious question on the streaming side, where some estimates peg unrecognized mechanical licenses in the 25-35% range.  But worldwide, serious concerns also surround the recognition of in-venue plays, particularly at clubs, festivals, and other locations.

Accordingly, a number of companies are actively solving this issue worldwide, with heavy coordination already occurring across digital distributors, recognition technology companies, and PROs.

Welcome to the fast-growing sector of in-venue Music Recognition Technology, or MRT.

It starts with the basic premise that nearly every song can be recognized using fingerprinting or other matching technologies, and those matches can be relayed back to every relevant party, including PROs.  The end result is that artists, labels, composers, and songwriters receive far better royalty payments, instead of losing the money in unmatched piles.

The concept of automatic music recognition has been with the industry for decades.  By the early ‘90s, Broadcast Data Systems (BDS) was a widely-deployed solution for automatically recognizing songs played on radio stations in the U.S., using previous technologies deployed in military combat.  These days, huge PROs like ASCAP rely on companies like Mediabase to help identify and pay artists on radio plays.

And most music fans are familiar with the magic of Shazam, now owned by Apple.  These days, it’s increasingly difficult to stump Shazam, and its recognitions have reshaped everything from A&R to music discovery and even producer/artist collaborations.

That evolution is now impacting venues like clubs, where a large percentage of songs are frequently missed — and unpaid.  Even decades after the core technology for audio recognition has been invented.

The result is that artists receiving a lot of plays in clubs aren’t getting properly paid, a situation that disproportionately impacts DJs and producers.  Even worse, the unclaimed songs often get paid to the wrong party after remaining unmatched for years.

Shockingly, a large percentage of clubs and festivals worldwide aren’t equipped with MRT technology.  Plays simply aren’t counted, and DJs and producers are the big losers.

That’s a serious market problem, though MRT solutions are increasingly gaining traction.  At this stage, clubs and other venues playing music can easily install hardware to recognize the plays, at very little cost.  Those recognitions are then compiled and relayed back to PROs, which incorporate these matches into their broader payouts.

Already, clubs and festivals are paying PROs a percentage of revenues.  An MRT solution simply helps to match that money to the proper rights owners, based on actual play data.

Paul Resnikoff

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